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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Dec 16, 2016

    Let’s get this rolling with:

    Tanker
    Tanker
    Tankers – All ships used to be “general cargo vessels”, they lifted whatever cargo was going and whether it was suitable of not, there was very little in the way of specialisation. Ships plied their trade wherever carried whatever was available. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Dec 02, 2016

    Security – Shipping has long been vulnerable to attack, fraud and crime at sea, so the industry takes maritime security seriously. People, cargoes and vessels have an inherent value and so are attractive targets for terrorists, pirates, fraudsters and criminals. Different areas have different risks, but security is an increasingly important part of shipboard operations. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Dec 02, 2016

    Radar – Radar is an “object-detection system” using radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect any objects which reflect radio waves – so is particularly good at sea for identifying and monitoring other ships, land and even nearby weather. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Nov 15, 2016

    Passage Planning – Passage planning or “voyage planning” is a procedure to develop a complete detailed strategy of a vessel’s voyage from start to finish, or “berth to berth”. The plan includes leaving the dock and harbour area, the en route portion of a voyage, approaching the destination, and mooring. According to international law, a vessel’s captain is legally responsible for passage planning – Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Nov 15, 2016

    Oil Tankers – Tankers carrying liquid cargoes such as crude oil, finished petroleum products, liquefied natural gas (LNG), chemicals, edible oils, wine, juice, and molasses are some of the mainstays of shipping. They play an important role in international trade with a share of over 33% of the world tonnage. Tankers come in varied sizes ranging from handysize tankers to ultra large crude carriers (ULCC) with a deadweight tonnage ranging between 320,000 to 550,000. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Nov 15, 2016

    Navigation – Navigation is about knowing where you are and the route to be taken to get somewhere else you wish to go. It involves the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle in that journey. While the disciplines include land, air and space – marine navigation is obviously key for shipping. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Nov 15, 2016

    Magnetic Compass – People have been navigating with magnetic compasses for the best part of 900 years. The magnetic compass was first invented as a device for divination as early as the Chinese Han Dynasty (since about 206 BC), and later adopted for navigation by the Song Dynasty Chinese during the 11th century. The first usage of a compass recorded in Western Europe and Persia occurred around the early 13th century. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Oct 21, 2016

    Loadlines – The point at which the surface of the water sits on a ship’s hull is called the “waterline”. If a vessel is too loaded, the waterline can sit dangerously close to the deck – a situation which needs to be avoided. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Oct 17, 2016

    Keel – On ships, the “keel” is a beam around which the hull of a ship is built. The keel runs in the transverse centreline of the ship, from the bow to the stern, and serves as a basic foundation or spine of the structure, providing the major source of structural strength of the hull. Continue reading

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    Posted by: Holly Savage on Oct 05, 2016

    Jack Tar – Jack Tar was a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy. It was mainly used during the times of the British Empire, and “jolly Jacks” would make themselves known in the far flung vestiges of the world. Continue reading

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